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Why did Lewis and Clark take the route they took?

Why did Lewis and Clark take the route they took?

President Thomas Jefferson commissioned the expedition shortly after the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 to explore and to map the newly acquired territory, to find a practical route across the western half of the continent, and to establish an American presence in this territory before European powers attempted to …

Why do you think Lewis and Clark wanted Sacagawea to go with them?

Lewis and Clark met Charbonneau and quickly hired him to serve as interpreter on their expedition. Even though she was pregnant with her first child, Sacagawea was chosen to accompany them on their mission. Lewis and Clark believed that her knowledge of the Shoshone language would help them later in their journey.

Why was Sacagawea important to the Lewis and Clark Expedition?

Simply because she was a woman, Sacagawea helped the Corps. Among the tribes the explorers met, her presence dispelled the notion that the group was a war party. William Clark explained that “the Wife of Shabono [Charbonneau]…reconciles all the Indians, as to our friendly intentions. A woman with a party of men is a token of peace.”

Who was the Shoshone woman who accompanied Lewis and Clark?

Statue of Sacagawea, a Shoshone woman who accompanied the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Sacagawea, sometimes called Sakajawea or Sakagawea (c. 1788 – December 20, 1812), was a Shoshone Indian woman who arrived with her husband Toussaint Charbonneau on the expedition to the Pacific Ocean.

How old was Sacagawea Charbonneau when she married Lewis and Clark?

Still, Sacagawea remains the third most famous member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. In the fall of 1804, Sacagawea was around seventeen years old, the pregnant second wife of French Canadian trader Toussaint Charbonneau, and living in Metaharta, the middle Hidatsa village on the Knife River of western North Dakota.

What did Sacagawea do for the Shoshone Indians?

William Clark explained that “the Wife of Shabono [Charbonneau]…reconciles all the Indians, as to our friendly intentions. A woman with a party of men is a token of peace.”. Once the Corps reached Idaho, Sacagawea’s knowledge of the landscape and the Shoshone language proved valuable.