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When did Mexico ban further immigration to Texas?

When did Mexico ban further immigration to Texas?

April 6, 1830. Tuesday Evening. Mexico Bans further Immigration to Texas. The Bustamente Decree. MEXICO CITY (1830) On this date in 1830, Mexico issued the Bustamante Decree which prohibited further immigration into Texas by Anglos, banned foreigners from the northern frontier of Texas, and banned further importation of slaves.

Why did Mexico encourage the settlement of Texas by Americans?

Why did Mexico encourage the settlement of Texas by Americans? Beginning in the 1820’s, Mexico encouraged Americans (such as Moses and Stephen Austin) to settle in their territory of Texas. It was this that led to Texas becoming independent of Mexico—something the government very definitely did not want.

How did the Bustamante decree affect immigration to Texas?

MEXICO CITY (1830) On this date in 1830, Mexico issued the Bustamante Decree which prohibited further immigration into Texas by Anglos, banned foreigners from the northern frontier of Texas, and banned further importation of slaves. Immigration continued however, and by 1836, the numbers of Anglos living in Texas was around 35,000.

Who was the father of immigration to Mexico?

Starting in 1821, Stephen F. Austin, the man later referred to as “The Father of Texas,” brought hundreds of American immigrants to Mexican Texas, with the explicit approval and support of the Mexican government.

How did Mexico encourage Americans to settle in Texas?

At first, Mexico encouraged Americans to settle Texas. They were given land that no Mexicans had yet laid claim to. These Americans became Mexican citizens and were supposed to learn Spanish and convert to Catholicism.

Why was slavery illegal in Mexico when the settlers arrived?

Because slavery was illegal in Mexico, these settlers made their slaves sign agreements giving them the status of indentured servants – essentially slavery by another name. The Mexican authorities grudgingly went along with it, but the issue occasionally flared up, especially when slaves ran off.