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What were the problems with the New Jersey Plan?

What were the problems with the New Jersey Plan?

Under the New Jersey Plan, the unicameral legislature with one vote per state was inherited from the Articles of Confederation. This position reflected the belief that the states were independent entities. Ultimately, the New Jersey Plan was rejected as a basis for a new constitution.

Was the New Jersey Plan for large states?

William Paterson proposed the New Jersey, or small state, plan, which provided for equal representation in Congress. Neither the large nor the small states would yield.

Why was the New Jersey Plan so bad?

Large states supported this plan, while smaller states generally opposed it. Under the New Jersey Plan, the unicameral legislature with one vote per state was inherited from the Articles of Confederation. Delegates from the large states were naturally opposed to the New Jersey Plan, as it would diminish their influence.

How did the Virginia Plan and New Jersey Plan work?

According to the Virginia Plan, each state would have a different number of representatives based on the state’s population. The smaller states favored the New Jersey Plan. . This two-house legislature plan worked for all states and became known as the Great Compromise. Nice work!

How did the Articles of Confederation affect the New Jersey Plan?

Under the Articles of Confederation, each state had equal representation in Congress, exercising one vote each. Paterson’s New Jersey Plan was ultimately a rebuttal to the Virginia Plan. Under the New Jersey Plan, the unicameral legislature with one vote per state was inherited from the Articles of Confederation.

Why did the smaller states like the Virginia Plan more?

It was introduced to the Constitutional Convention by William Paterson, a New Jersey delegate, on June 15, 1787. Why did the smaller states like this plan more? The larger states favored the Virginia Plan. According to the Virginia Plan, each state would have a different number of representatives based on the state’s population.