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What is Louis Joliet famous for?

What is Louis Joliet famous for?

The first significant Canadian-born explorer, Louis Jolliet achieved international fame in his lifetime as the first non-Aboriginal person, together with Jacques Marquette, to travel and map the Mississippi River.

Did Louis Jolliet get married?

In 1675, Louis Jolliet returned to an apparently more sedentary life. He married Claire-Françoise Bissot, played the organ in the cathedral at Quebec, and became an influential personality in the colony.

Who did Louis Jolliet sail for?

In 1672 he was commissioned by the governor of New France to explore the Mississippi, and he was joined by Marquette. On May 17, 1673, the party set out in two birchbark canoes from Michilimackinac (St. Ignace, Mich.)

What is named after Louis Jolliet?

The Louis Jolliet rose, developed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, was named in his honor. The Jolliet Squadron of cadets at the Royal Military College Saint-Jean in the Province of Quebec was named in his honor.

Where did Louis Joliet go on his expeditions?

Joliet made later expeditions to the Hudson Bay and Labrador Coast. Louis Joliet (also spelled “Jolliet”) was born sometime in the mid-17th century in or near the Quebec, New France settlement to Marie d’Abancourt and John Joliet.

Where did Louis Jolliet set off in 1669?

It is not impossible, although we possess no indication of it. In 1669, it is true, a “sieur Jolliet” set off with Jean Peré, in search of a copper mine on Lake Superior, but it has been possible to demonstrate that this is a reference to Adrien, Louis’s brother.

Where was Louis Joliet born and when was he born?

Louis Joliet (also spelled “Jolliet”) was born sometime in the mid-17th century in or near the Quebec, New France settlement to Marie d’Abancourt and John Joliet.

How did Louis Joliet die on his way back to Quebec?

Marquette came back to the area the following year with plans of proselytization, but died from dysentery. Joliet split from Marquette on his way back to Quebec and, in 1674, took a shortcut through the rapids of Lachine along the St. Lawrence. His canoe capsized, taking the lives of the additional passengers, including the chief’s son.