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What did the Mormons have to give up to become a state?

What did the Mormons have to give up to become a state?

The Mormon leaders hosted a constitutional convention to write a constitution for the new state they wanted. They wanted to name the state Deseret, and it would have been huge. It would have included Utah, most of Nevada and Arizona, and parts of southern California, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Oregon, and Idaho.

How did the US acquire Utah?

Becoming a State In 1848, the United States gained control of Utah from Mexico as a result of the Mexican-American War. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wanted to join the United States as the state of Deseret, but instead the land became the Utah Territory.

How long did it take the Mormons to settle in Utah?

After 17 months and many miles of travel, Brigham Young leads 148 pioneers into Utah’s Valley of the Great Salt Lake.

Who was the leader of the Mormons in Utah?

It would have included Utah, most of Nevada and Arizona, and parts of southern California, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Oregon, and Idaho. The Mormons also elected all-Mormon leaders for this “state,” with Brigham Young as governor. They sent Almon Babbitt to Washington D.C. as their state representative.

What did the Mormons do to become a state?

Mormons disbanded the People’s party and leaders advised the members to join one of the two national parties. The pen Grover Cleveland used to sign the Enabling Act, permitting Utahns to “form a Constitution and be admitted into the Union on an equal footing with the other States.”

What did the Book of Mormon say about Utah?

In 1849, he sent representatives to Congress with a proposed map of the state of Deseret (a word from the Book of Mormon meaning “honeybee”.) The state would have been massive, encompassing present-day Utah, most of Nevada, good chunks of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and Idaho, and even the city of San Diego.