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How did the New Jersey and Virginia plans differ?

How did the New Jersey and Virginia plans differ?

How did the Virginia plan differ from the New Jersey plan? The Virginia Plan called for three branches of government and two houses of Congress. Representation in each house would be determined by population. The New Jersey Plan called for three branches of government and a single house of Congress.

What is the correct description of the New Jersey Plan?

William Paterson’s New Jersey Plan proposed a unicameral (one-house) legislature with equal votes of states and an executive elected by a national legislature. This plan maintained the form of government under the Articles of Confederation while adding powers to raise revenue and regulate commerce and foreign affairs.

How is the New Jersey Plan different from the Virginia Plan?

New Jersey Plan Opposite of the Virginia Plan, it proposed a single-chamber congress in which each state had one vote. This created a conflict with representation between bigger states, who wanted control befitting their population, and smaller states, who didn’t want to be bullied by larger states. Proportional Representation

Why did smaller states object to the New Jersey Plan?

Smaller states objected to this plan because it limited their control in Congress. The New Jersey Plan called for only one legislative house with equal representation by all states. In the end, both plans were rejected.

What was the problem with the Virginia Plan?

the branch of government that makes the laws. Opposite of the Virginia Plan, it proposed a single-chamber congress in which each state had one vote. This created a conflict with representation between bigger states, who wanted control befitting their population, and smaller states, who didn’t want to be bullied by larger states.

What did the New Jersey Plan call for?

The New Jersey Plan called for only one legislative house with equal representation by all states. In the end, both plans were rejected. Roger Sherman, a delegate present at the Constitutional Convention, proposed a two-chamber Congress, which led to the formation of the House of Representatives.