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How did Frederick Douglass change America?

How did Frederick Douglass change America?

Frederick Douglass’ most important legacy was the use of his words to fight for the freedom and rights of African Americans. He then advocated for equal rights and opportunities for his fellow Americans as a Civil Rights leader. He published “The North Star” and “Frederick Douglass’ Paper to convey his message.

Who is Frederick Douglass and what did he want for America?

Frederick Douglass–Abolitionist Leader Douglass’s goals were to “abolish slavery in all its forms and aspects, promote the moral and intellectual improvement of the COLORED PEOPLE, and hasten the day of FREEDOM to the Three Millions of our enslaved fellow countrymen.” How else did Douglass promote freedom?

What are some of Frederick Douglass accomplishments?

10 Major Accomplishments of Frederick Douglass

  • #1 Douglass was the an important leader in the Abolitionism movement.
  • #2 His memoir was influential in fuelling abolitionist movement in America.
  • #3 His works are considered classics of American autobiography.
  • #4 He established an influential antislavery newspaper.

Who was the audience for Frederick Douglass speech?

Frederick Douglass’s intended audience was white people, mainly in the north, as he wanted to convince them of the damaging effects of slavery and to convince them that slavery should be abolished.

How did Douglass escape from slavery?

Frederick Douglass. On September 3, 1838, abolitionist, journalist, author, and human rights advocate Frederick Douglass made his dramatic escape from slavery—traveling north by train and boat—from Baltimore, through Delaware, to Philadelphia.

What did Frederick Douglass do for slavery?

Frederick Douglass was an escaped slave who became a prominent activist, author and public speaker. He became a leader in the abolitionist movement, which sought to end the practice of slavery, before and during the Civil War.