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What exactly is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?

What exactly is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a collection of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean. Marine debris is litter that ends up in oceans, seas, and other large bodies of water. This convergence zone is where warm water from the South Pacific meets up with cooler water from the Arctic.

What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and how did it come to be?

The Great Pacific garbage patch formed gradually as a result of ocean or marine pollution gathered by ocean currents. It occupies a relatively stationary region of the North Pacific Ocean bounded by the North Pacific Gyre in the horse latitudes.

What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and why is it a problem?

Debris trapped in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is harmful to marine life. For example, loggerhead turtles consume plastic bags because they have a similar appearance to jellyfish when they are floating in the water. In turn, the plastic can hurt, starve, or suffocate the turtle.

Who is responsible for the Great Pacific garbage patch?

But specifically, scientists say, the bulk of the garbage patch trash comes from China and other Asian countries. This shouldn’t be a surprise: Overall, worldwide, most of the plastic trash in the ocean comes from Asia.

What makes up the Great Pacific garbage patch?

The “garbage patch” is a popular name for concentrations of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean. While higher concentrations of litter items can be found in this area, much of the debris is actually small pieces of floating plastic that are not immediately evident to the naked eye. Ocean debris is continuously mixed by wind and wave action…

Where is the garbage patch in the Atlantic Ocean?

Research indicates that the patch is rapidly accumulating. A similar patch of floating plastic debris is found in the Atlantic Ocean, called the North Atlantic garbage patch. The patch is created in the gyre of the North Pacific Subtropical Convergence Zone.

Where are the eastern and Western garbage patches?

What has been referred to as the “Eastern Garbage Patch” lies between Hawaii and California, while the “Western Garbage Patch” extends eastward from Japan to the Hawaiian Islands.

What kind of animals live in the Pacific garbage patch?

Cetaceans have been sighted within the patch, which poses entanglement and ingestion risks to animals using the Great Pacific garbage patch as a migration corridor or core habitat. Affected species include sea turtles, the black-footed albatross, many species of whales, among many others.