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What is the movement of plates at each boundary?

What is the movement of plates at each boundary?

The movement of the plates creates three types of tectonic boundaries: convergent, where plates move into one another; divergent, where plates move apart; and transform, where plates move sideways in relation to each other. They move at a rate of one to two inches (three to five centimeters) per year.

What type of plate boundary shows plates moving toward the same place?

Convergent boundaries, where two plates are moving toward each other, are of three types, depending on the type of crust present on either side of the boundary — oceanic or continental.

What are the different types of plate movement?

4 Types Of Tectonic Plate Movement. 1 Divergent Boundaries. Divergent boundaries occur when a specific movement happens between the plates. This movement is the plates pulling away from 2 Convergent Boundaries. 3 Transform Fault Boundaries And Plate Boundary Zones.

How does plate movement occur at a transform boundary?

At a transform boundary, two plates slip past one another laterally. This slippage occurs along great vertical fractures called transform faults. Because the plate movement is basically parallel to a transform boundary, these boundaries neither create new crust nor destroy old.

What are the different types of tectonic plate boundaries?

There are 4 different types of tectonic plate boundaries. These boundaries describe how the plates are moving, which is what we will be talking about in this article. Divergent boundaries occur when a specific movement happens between the plates. This movement is the plates pulling away from each other.

What happens to the plates when they meet?

When these plates meet, their relative motion determines the type of boundary like convergent, divergent or transform. Volcanic activity, earthquakes, mountain-building and oceanic trench formation occur along these plate boundaries. The relative movement of the plates typically ranges from zero to 100 mm annually.